Neil Postman’s Advice on How to Live the Rest of Your Life

7. Establish as many regular routines as possible.
In order to position yourself well to cope with constant change, you should
establish as many predictable structures and routines as possible. The point is
to reduce the number of decisions you have to make about trivial matters. Save
your energy for major questions that arise in our technological society. Regularize the trivial to cope with the significant…

Nystrom’s Nugget #1
Reserve the word ‘friend’ for someone who knew you when you still wore
braces on your teeth, who has on at least one occasion spent the night with you
in a hospital emergency room or police station, and who will without hesitation
commit perjury for you in a court of law. Other people may rightly be called
‘acquaintances.’

13. Read’s Law: Do not trust any group larger than a squad, that is, about
a dozen.

All bureaucracies are alike, their principal characteristic being their wish to
satisfy the rules of the system. Bureaucracies are by nature hostile to individual
differences. Although we pretend institutions care, institutions do not have loyalty, compassion, or feelings, which are human traits…

16. Weingartner’s Law: 95% of everything is nonsense.
Do not allow yourself to become grim about anything. Above all, do not be-
come an ist: a socialist, a feminist, a capitalist, etc. This will help you avoid
hardenings of the categories and help you keep your sense of humor…

19. Divest yourself of your belief in the magical powers of numbers.
Quantification has a very limited effectiveness. Any attempt to apply quantifi-
cation to human affairs represents pure superstition of a medieval kind. Never-theless, modern America is based on counting. We try to redefine non-quantifiable concepts into objective quantities: for example, take the numerical scores given for intelligence tests or for contestants in beauty pageants. This passion for numbers and quantification must be discarded…

Nystrom’s Nugget #5
Do not place too high a value on honesty and plain speaking. You are not wise
enough to know what is the truth, and what seems plain to you may only bring
pain to others.

Postman’s Addendum to Nugget #5: Of all the virtues, the most overrated is
honesty. Honesty is the first refuge of the scoundrel. According to Irish writer
Oliver Goldsmith, the main use of language is to conceal your thoughts, not to
reveal them. In some sense, by suggesting that speaking your mind can be up-
setting, Nugget #5 offers an anti-ventilation theory.

-Janet Sternberg, “Neil Postman’s Advice on How to Live the Rest of Your Life.” Academia.edu. December 8, 2005

h/t Austin Kleon.