Mutt on OpenBSD & Linux: configuring gpg/gpg2 & ~/.muttrc

Update: August 2019. In August 2017, I wrote this post to document my process for getting gpg2 working on OpenBSD 6.1 after not finding a straight-forward explanation online. In the two years since, I have used these notes to set up mutt on both OpenBSD and several varieties of Linux, such as Debian derivatives, Arch and others. With a little work, I have managed to get mutt working on each of these systems.

In the update, I went through through and cleaned up the post a bit for clarity and fixed some formatting now that WordPress has better options for including code. If you are trying to get gpg/gpg2 working with mutt, hopefully, this will help you too. If you find errors, please feel free to comment below and I’ll try to fix them.

Install mutt and gnupg

[OpenBSD] # pkg_add -i mutt gnupg 

A series of options will display. Pick the current version of mutt-1.8.0v3-gpgme-sasl and gnupg-2.1.15p2.

[Ubuntu/Debian] # sudo apt-get install mutt gnupg

Change to the relevant package manager equivalent if you don’t use apt. You may also need to add cyrus-sasl to your package manager on linuxes without it baked in.

Copy gpg.conf to your home directory

[OpenBSD] $ cp /usr/local/share/gnupg/options.skel ~/.gnupg/gpg.conf
[Ubuntu/Debian]$ cp /usr/share/doc/mutt/examples/gpg.rc ~/.gnupg/gpg.conf

On Ubuntu/Debian, this step might not be necessary. If using gpg2, you’ll need to substitute gpg2 for all the gpg commands in the config file should you need it.

Add text to gpg.conf

# Enable gpg-agent
 use-agent
 pinentry-mode loopback

This step seemed required on OpenBSD. On many varieties of Linux, it does not seem to matter. I’d guess gnome has something that automagically handles this in the background.

Start the gpg-connect-agent daemon

$ gpg-connect-agent

On some linux distros, this step may already be taken care of for you.

Import your secret and public gpg keys

$ gpg2 --decrypt file.sec.gpg | gpg2 --import --batch

If you don’t have gpg keys yet, check out man for gpg or the Ubuntu privacy documentation for details about doing it.

Check your gpg keyring

$ gpg2 -K

$ gpg2 -K

Important step. It’s very easy during the import process to type in a key, password, or command wrong and not import your secret keys. I ended up troubleshooting my mutt configuration for a couple of hours before I figured out it wasn’t working because I didn’t have my gpg keys on my keyring. Save yourself this trouble and check.

Create a text file with your email password

set imap_pass = "yourpassword"
set smtp_pass = "yourpassword"

Save this file to ~/.gnupg/email-password.gpg

Encrypt your email-password.gpg file

$ gpg2 --encrypt /home/cafebedouin/.gnupg/email-password.gpg

Add a .mailcap configuration file for HTML email in Mutt

Put the following in your ~/.mailcap file or create one if it doesn’t exist. Install lynx or another text browser of your choice. If different, change lynx to the alternative in the text below.

text/html;  /usr/bin/firefox %s >/dev/null 2>&1; needsterminal
text/html;  lynx -dump %s; nametemplate=%s.html; copiousoutput

Create a ~/.muttrc configuration file

# .muttrc                                                                      
                                                                               
# GPG                                                                          
# gpg.rc is unnecessary on some systems.                            
# On OpenBSD, you're probably going to need it.                              
# OpenBSD: /usr/local/share/examples/mutt/gpg.rc                               
#                                                                              
# source ~/.mutt/gpg.rc                                                        

set pgp_use_gpg_agent = yes                                                    
set pgp_sign_as = 0O0ABCDZ  # replace with your key                            
set pgp_timeout = 7200                                                         
set crypt_autosign = no                                                        
set crypt_replyencrypt = no 

# password: tell mutt where to find your encrypted
# password, depending on what you installed, you 
# may need to change initial command to gpg
source "gpg2 -dq ~/.mutt/email-password.gpg |"                       
                                                                               
# mailbox configuration                                                        
set imap_user           = login@example.net                                    
                                                                               
# Only need the example.net if your root email address is different from server, otherwise just use your login                     
set folder              = imaps://login@example.net@example.com:993            
set spoolfile           = imaps://login@example.net@example.com/INBOX               
set smtp_url            = smtp://login@example.net@example.com:587                  
set postponed           = +Drafts                                              
set record              = +Sent                                                
set trash               = +Trash 
mailboxes               = +INBOX                                               
set hostname            = example.net                                          
set from                = login@example.net                                    
                                                                               
# mutt configuration                                                           
set ssl_starttls        = yes                                                  
set use_from            = yes                                                  
set postpone            = ask-yes                                              
set delete              = ask-yes                                              
set editor              = "emacs -nw" # or vi               
set pager               = lynx                                          
set charset             = "utf-8"                                              
set visual              = "emacs"                                              
set signature           = ~/.mutt/sig.txt
set alias_file          = ~/.mutt/aliases                                      
set mailcap_path        = ~/.mailcap                                           
set fcc_clear                                                                  
set noconfirmappend                                                            
set hidden_host                                                                
                                                                               
auto_view text/html             # auto render html to text                     
alternative_order text/plain text/enriched text/html    # read html last       
                                                                               
# Reduce polling frequency to a sane level                                     
set mail_check=60                                                              
                                                                               
# keep a cache of headers for faster loading (1.5.9+?)                         
set header_cache=~/.hcache                                                     
set edit_headers=yes                                                           
                                                                               
# Display download progress every 10K                                          
set net_inc=10 

The line to decrypt your password activates the gpg-connect-agent daemon and will not ask for you to enter it again for the duration of pgp_timeout specified in the file.

This should get you to a working set-up to read and write email. If you are having trouble logging in, double check your encrypted password file, particularly if your password requires escaping special characters.

Good luck!

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