Blog Diet: A Starter List For Your RSS Reader (Updated Spring 2022) by Warren Ellis

“People keep asking me where I find stuff, or where to start with an RSS reader.

I exported my subscriptions, and damn, there are a LOT of dead blogs out there. I’m actually shocked at how much of my list is now gone. (And how many sites have shut off their RSS!) Here is a selection of blogs from the list of ones I think are still active. Like I say, it’s just a bit of my active subscriptions list, but maybe you’ll find something you want to follow.”

-Warren Ellis, “Blog Diet: A Starter List For Your RSS Reader (Updated Spring 2022).” warrenellis.ltd. April 22, 2022.

Here’s a list of “best” free RSS Readers for 2022. I’ve talked about RSS Readers a bit here in the past and suggested some places to start. I’m used Nextcloud News, newsboat, and flym. I like newsboat quite a bit, but I find I don’t check it as much as if it is in a mobile app. YMMV.

Smol Pub

Smol Pub is tiny blogging service.

– Web interface and CLI to manage your posts.
– Accessible from Web, Gemini and Gopher.
– Storage for your images.
– Write custom CSS for web.
– Attach your custom domain with SSL.
– Export your posts.
– No JavaScript, ads, or tracking technology.

On the back of My Writing Advice post from yesterday, a suggestion. If you want a low stakes online venue to just start a daily writing practice, Smol Pub would fit the bill. It’s $5 to get a key to start using it. Try it out. It’s nothing complicated, and you could try it for 30 days (or longer) and see if it works for you.

I find WordPress easy to use. But, there is a bit of a noodling period, particularly in the beginning, where you mess around with templates and so forth. There are templates on Smol Pub too, but it looks like it is much easier to set-up.

Linux: Importing Keys from OpenKeychain (and Elsewhere) into GnuPG

Every now and again, I have to transfer my GPG keys to a new machine and I always forget how to do it. So, I figured I’d write a few notes to remember in the future.

Key detail: when you do a full back-up, it will export a file in the format: backup-YYYY-MM-DD.sec.pgp. You will also be given a password in the form of XXXX-XXXX-XXXX-XXXX-XXXX-XXXX. The password is a series of uppercase letters and numbers. So, at a command prompt in Linux, type:

$ gpg2 --decrypt backup_YYYY-MM-DD.sec.pgp | gpg2 --import

When you are prompted for the initial password, make sure to use the one in the format above and include the dashes. After, you will be prompted for the private key password(s) that have been backed up in order to import them.

I did cover this in my post on mutt, but I didn’t think to look there this time. So, I figure it deserves its own entry.

The Pandemic Cyclone

“This chart shows the daily number of new Covid-19 infections in each state over time. The y-axis is the population-normalized number of new infections per day; the x-axis is the rate of transmission (Rt). Each dot is a state or territory of the US, colored by region, and the area of the dot is proportional to the estimated number of new Covid-19 infections on that day.

https://observablehq.com/@chrisjkuch/covid-hotspots

I thought this was an interesting way to visualize the time series data.

bash: Last Day, The People Who Lived As Many Days as You

Definitions

  • bash: This is the command line, where you can run relatively simple scripted programs, available on all three major computing platforms.
  • SPARQL: On the Internet, there are repositories of information. Some of these repositories are in a format called RDF, or Resource Description Framework. Users of these repositories typically need a subset of the information contained in them. In order to get the desired information, they need a way to query these repositories in a structured way to get the information they want. SPARQL is that querying language.
  • Wikidata is an RDF repository. It is hosted by the same organization as Wikipedia, but it is subject to different rules. I do not think Notability and some of the cultural problems of Wikipedia extend to Wikidata. I’d be happy to hear if anyone is aware of problems in the dataset, since this is one of the few times I’ve worked with it.

Inspiration

Most mornings, my wife and I read The New York Times The Morning Briefing. Typically, this will include an obituary of a celebrity. If the person is less than 80 years old, my wife will say something like, “They died young.” She thinks everyone should live to be a hundred years of age.

I tend to think more relativistically. Someone died young, if they were younger than me. It got me thinking, “Is it possible to write a script to find out who lived exactly the same number of days I have lived today?”

It turns out to be fairly easy to do using bash, a SPARQL query link and Wikidata.

bash script

#!/bin/bash
# variables
BIRTHDAY=$(date -d '2000-01-01' +%s) # enter birthday in YYYY-MM-DD format
TODAYS_DATE=$(date +%s)
DAYS_ALIVE=$(((TODAYS_DATE - BIRTHDAY) / 86400)) # converts seconds to days

# Test output
# echo "birthday: ${BIRTHDAY} | today's date: ${TODAYS_DATE} | days_alive: ${DAYS_ALIVE}"

#url for sparql query of wikidata can be obtained: https://query.wikidata.org/, click link to it below
firefox 'https://query.wikidata.org/embed.html#SELECT%20DISTINCT%20%3Fperson%20%3FpersonLabel%20%3FpersonDescription%20WHERE%20%7B%0A%20%20SERVICE%20wikibase%3Alabel%20%7B%20bd%3AserviceParam%20wikibase%3Alanguage%20%22%5BAUTO_LANGUAGE%5D%22.%20%7D%0A%20%20%7B%0A%20%20%20%20SELECT%20DISTINCT%20%3Fperson%20%3FpersonLabel%20%3FpersonDescription%20%7B%0A%20%20%20%20%20%20%3Fperson%20wdt%3AP31%20wd%3AQ5%3B%20%20%20%20%20%20%20%20%20%20%20%20%20%0A%20%20%20%20%20%20%20%20%20%20%20%20%20%20wdt%3AP569%20%3Fborn%3B%20%20%20%20%20%20%20%20%20%20%20%20%0A%20%20%20%20%20%20%20%20%20%20%20%20%20%20wdt%3AP570%20%3Fdied%3B%20%20%20%20%20%20%20%20%20%20%20%20%0A%20%20%20%20%20%20%20%20%20%20%20%20%20%20wdt%3AP27%20wd%3AQ30%20%20%20%20%20%20%20%20%20%20%20%20%20%0A%20%20%20%20%20%20BIND(%3Fdied%20-%20%3Fborn%20AS%20%3FageInDays).%20%0A%20%20%20%20%20%20FILTER(%3FageInDays%20%3D%20'"$DAYS_ALIVE"').%20%20%0A%20%20%20%20%7D%0A%20%20%20%20LIMIT%2025%0A%20%20%7D%0A%7D%0A'

bash script output

SPARQL query

You can input the following into the Wikidata SPARQL query interface and change the perimeters. Specifically, the bash variable $DAYS_ALIVE needs to be changed to an integer to work in the query interface, e.g., FILTER(?ageInDays = 11000). You can also do ranges using multiplication, e.g., FILTER(?ageInDays < (31*365) && ?ageInDays > (30*365)), if you want people between the ages of 30 to 31.

SELECT DISTINCT ?person ?personLabel ?personDescription WHERE {
  SERVICE wikibase:label { bd:serviceParam wikibase:language "[AUTO_LANGUAGE]". }
  {
    SELECT DISTINCT ?person ?personLabel ?personDescription {
      ?person wdt:P31 wd:Q5;             # any person
              wdt:P569 ?born;            # that has a birth date
              wdt:P570 ?died;            # and a death date
              wdt:P27 wd:Q30             # that was a citizen of the United States
      BIND(?died - ?born AS ?ageInDays). # calculate days they lived
      FILTER(?ageInDays = $DAYS_ALIVE).  # match the number of days to your current number of days alive
    }
    LIMIT 25
  }
}

Accessing a Locked Android Phone Not Displaying A Keyboard

I use AnySoftKeyboard as my keyboard of choice on Android. It’s great, except when my SD Card becomes corrupted. When that happens, AnySoftKeyboard no longer works. If my device is locked at the time, there doesn’t appear to be a way to type in my password to unlock the device.

There is a solution to this problem, if you have enabled Developer options and USB debugging on the device. Boot into recovery (Volume Up, Home & Power, all at the same time). Start adb on the device. Connect it to your computer with adb and reboot. Then from a command prompt on the computer, type in the following:

$ adb shell input text password && adb shell input keyevent 66

This will basically work just like the displayed keyboard on your device. keyevent 66 is the equivalent of Enter. Then, you can reformat your SDCard in Settings. Then, reboot the device and you will be good to go.

Mining the Ergo Cryptocurrency in the ergo.getblok.io Pool

Mining Ergo as part of the ergo.getblok.io mining pool is easy, particularly on Windows. If you already have a Ergo wallet, it can be set-up on a computer with a GPU video card compatible with mining Ergo in less than 5 minutes.

For Ergo, you need a card with a minimum of 4GB of RAM, ideally more. Create a Ergo wallet using Yoroi, if you don’t have one already. Download mining software compatible with your card, i.e., T-Rex (Nvidia) or RedTeamMiner (AMD). Extract the mining software file in your Download directory. Open a text editor, and type in (or copy & paste) the following, assuming in this example you are on Windows:

setx GPU_FORCE_64BIT_PTR 0
setx GPU_MAX_HEAP_SIZE 100
setx GPU_USE_SYNC_OBJECTS 1
setx GPU_MAX_ALLOC_PERCENT 100
setx GPU_SINGLE_ALLOC_PERCENT 100

C:\Users\your_username\path\to\mining\file\t-rex.exe -a autolykos2 -o stratum+ssl://ergo.getblok.io:4056 -u <YourErgoAddress>.<AnyNameYouWantToIdentifyTheComputer>

For clarity, <YourErgoAddress>.<AnyNameYouWantToIdentifyTheComputer> should look something like:

C:\Users\cafebedouin\Downloads\t-rex-0.24.7-win\t-rex.exe -a autolykos2 -o stratum+ssl://ergo.getblok.io:4056 -u 9g1p6UU8XoAeU4yGPLpbTHYiG8aBHwfCFzQqJZrfzuLnmF3zb7P.covertmixeraddress

You can find your address by going to the Receive tab in Yoroi, you can then go to the getblok.io website and put in the information this page asks for and it will provide the information above for you. Save the file as ERGO_mining.bat. To start mining, simply click on the file.

Note: If you have a virus protection program like McAfee, you’ll need to restore the t-rex.exe file after extraction and exclude it from Real-Time Scanning in order to run it.

If you want the mining software to start when you reboot your computer, then, save ERGO_mining.bat in C:\Users\Username\AppData\Roaming\Microsoft\Windows\Start Menu\Programs\Startup. If you have trouble finding the Startup folder, you can always save ERGO_mining.bat somewhere, type the Windows key + R to get the shell prompt, then type:

shell:startup 

This will bring up the Startup folder, and you can drag and drop the Ergo_mining.bat file into it.

Linux

This is harder for me to comment on since I am using a AMD card on my Linux machine, which can be a bit of a PITA to configure correctly. These instructions will get you in the ballpark with an AMD card, but be prepared to do some troubleshooting.

Let’s assume that you somehow managed to get your graphics card working on Linux. Then, the process is very similar to Windows above. Open a text editor and type the following:

#!/bin/bash

export GPU_MAX_ALLOC_PERCENT=100
export GPU_SINGLE_ALLOC_PERCENT=100
export GPU_MAX_HEAP_SIZE=100
export GPU_USE_SYNC_OBJECTS=1

/home/cafebedouin/Downloads/teamredminer-v0.8.6.3-linux/teamredminer -a autolykos2 -o stratum+ssl://ergo.getblok.io:4056 -u  9g1p6UU8XoAeU4yGPLpbTHYiG8aBHwfCFzQqJZrfzuLnmF3zb7P.covertmixeraddress

Then, save the file as ergo_miner.sh. At the command prompt: chmod 744 ergo_miner.sh and then just run it as usual, by typing: ./ergo_miner.sh at the prompt. If you want it to automatically run whenever you restart your machine, this image from linuxconfig.org tells you everything you need to do to set it as a systemd service.