Net Alert | Secure Accounts

Secure Accounts is comprised of five different modules, each designed to function as a standalone resource on a specific aspect of account security, or as a series, with each module building on one another.

The five modules include:

  • Secure Your Accounts: A comic that explains why people should take their account security seriously
  • Account Phishing and Civil Society: A brief explanation of what phishing is and two examples of phishing attacks against civil society groups based on recent Citizen Lab research
  • 2-step verification in 2-minutes: A comic that explains what 2-step verification is and why it’s important
  • Set up 2-step verification now: A collection of links to instructions on how to set up 2-step verification on popular online platforms
  • Who could get access?: A app that users humour to highlight how adopting better security habits will mean hackers need more time and skill to break into your accounts

World-Wide Labyrinth Locator

The Labyrinth Locator has “[i]nformation about labyrinths you can visit, including their locations, pictures, and contact details, along with information about the many types of labyrinths found worldwide. Labyrinths occur in many forms, shapes, and sizes, and the Locator contains both historic and modern examples. Currently, the Worldwide Labyrinth Locator database contains more than 5400 labyrinths (including a few mazes) in more than 80 different countries around the world.”

American Prison Writing Archive

The American Prison Writing Archive is “the largest collection to date of non-fiction writing by currently incarcerated Americans writing about their experience inside…

…[The] goal [of the archive] is to replace speculation on and misrepresentation of prisons and imprisoned people with first-person witness by those on the receiving end of American criminal justice. No single essay can tell us all that we need to know. But a mass-scale, national archive of writing by incarcerated people can begin to strip away widely circulated myths and replace them with some sense of the true human costs of the current legal order. By soliciting, preserving, digitizing and disseminating the work of imprisoned people, we hope to ground national debate on mass incarceration in the lived experience of those who know jails and prisons best.”