Reduce Your Death Anxiety

“The one thing all human beings have in common, is the fact that one day, our lives will end in death.

What does the idea of death mean to you? How does it make you feel?

Chances are the thought of death triggers fear or anxiety in you. You might not feel totally comfortable with the idea of dying and your life coming to an end.

Research shows that in our modern-day Western society death denial is a common attitude. Which is very contradictory in itself when you think about it, as death is ultimately the one thing we can not avoid from happening.

Ignoring death often leads to more death anxiety which can have a huge impact on your mental health and your day-to-day life, while contemplating death will give you the benefits of going through life more aware and with greater purpose.

With my online video course I will give you the tools to explore your relationship with mortality, and reduce your death anxiety.

https://acourseindying.com/get-ahead-of-death-online-video-course-on-mortality/

My father-in-law recently died after several years of illness. Talking about the possibility of dying is fraught with people engaged in magical thinking, as if broaching the subject is causal. It’s simply a reality people must face, and when they put it off, it is invariably worse. For €79, it’s probably a useful exercise, but the reality is the people that really need it won’t be the one’s buying this course.

TweetDelete

“TweetDelete is a service that can mass delete your Twitter posts based on their age or specific text they contain. It can also run automatically on a schedule if you wish.”

https://tweetdelete.net/

I haven’t tried it, but I read that this can do a rolling delete at a particular time, say 6 months. It seems like it might be useful to some people.

The Sh*t You Don’t Learn in School Podcast

Formal schooling does a terrible job of preparing you to thrive as an adult. The Sh*t You Don’t Learn in School podcast exists to make up for this societal failure. 

In this show, Calvin Rosser and Steph Smith share stories, insights, and resources designed to help you improve the quality of your personal and professional life. 

If works out, you’ll be 1% better at navigating life. Check out all of the episodes here.

-Calvin Rosser, “The Sh*t You Don’t Learn in School Podcast.” calvinrosser.com.

Alex Karp: Palantir & Privacy

“Palantir Technologies is considered as one of the most secretive companies in the world. The customer list of the data specialist from Palo Alto, California, by all accounts includes nearly all governments and secret services of the Western world. As well as an increasing number of companies who want to deliver better products thanks to the structured data analysis from Palantir. In the first of the two-part podcast interview with Alex Karp, who has also been on the supervisory board of Axel Springer since April 2018, Mathias Döpfner asks him how he counters critics of Palantir, whether Palantir was involved in locating Osama bin Laden and what it is that makes him most proud of Palantir. 

During the first part of the interview, which lasts a good 20 minutes, Alex Karp, who is usually as reserved in public as Palantir itself, also provides insights into the early days of the company, when hardly anyone believed in the potential of data, and explains why he sees protecting data as a competitive advantage. Karp, addressing Europe, also warns against softening data protection regulations. According to Karp, it’s all about striving for the best combination of “maximum effective Artificial Intelligence and maximum effective data protection”. “Because nobody, or nobody at least in Europe, wants to live in a world where they have no private sphere.” 

-“Mathias Döpfner interviews Alex Karp in the Axel Springer: ‘No one wants to live in a world where they have no private sphere’.” inside.pod. January 23, 2022.

I haven’t listened to it yet. So, this is more bookmark than recommendation. However, I understand this tries to address some of the philosophical objections to Palantir, which are many.

Oh, You Think You Use a Notebook?

“This year (2022) is going to see my journal/log’s 10th anniversary and 100th notebook. After many attempts to write this up, I’m just going to disgorge it all. This article is long and rambling and I make no apology for it. Feel free to skip around to any part of it which you find interesting.”

-Dave Gauer, “My Notebook System.” ratfactor.com. February 27, 2022.

I’ve been trying to work on a balance between digital capture – which I use for Zuihitsu, Words & Phrases, GoodReads for Books, Letterboxd for movies, and so forth – and an analog bullet list to be organized with my calendar, things to get done, etc. I’m not really where I want to be on all of it. I thought this post had some interesting ideas and wanted to bookmark it..

Satellite Imagery for Everyone

“The first place to look for free satellite imagery is the Copernicus Open Access Hub and EarthExplorer. Both offer free access to a wide range of open data. The imagery is lower resolution than what you can purchase, but if the limited resolution meets your needs, why spend money?

-Dexter Jagula, “Satellite Imagery for Everyone:
Here’s how you can order up a high-resolution image of any place on Earth.” IEEE Spectrum. February 19, 2022.

Interesting overview of satellites, the satellite imagery market, and how it might become ubiquitous, with everyday consumer applications, like GPS.