Ishkur’s Guide to Electronic Music

“This guide is rated [M] Mature. It is a love letter to underground counter-culture. 90% of the music here is enjoyed by freaks wearing crazy outfits, consuming copious amounts of drugs, and engaging in 3-day sex benders with indeterminate genders. It is not for children. I am not going to sanitize things just so your precious little Jeighden can locate the latest tweenwave ringtone they ripped off Twitch…

Q: What literature did you read to learn all this stuff?

A: I have 30 years of back issues of Electronic Music and Keyboard magazine, with an ungodly number of books also collected over the decades…As for modern literature, a better answer is what I don’t read: For starters, any magazine, blog, website, newsletter, flyer, TV show, podcast, record label, chart, press release or bathroom graffiti that uses the acronym ‘EDM’ is complete donkey balls and should not be relied on as a source for anything…

Q: What makes you the authority on electronic music?

A: You may know some of it more than me, but I know all of it more than you.”

http://music.ishkur.com/#

This guide is not complete donkey balls. Even if you have zero interest in electronic music, the frequently unasked questions page, some of which is quoted above, is hilarious.

h/t Openculture.

Nobias

“Track media bias, credibility, authenticity, and politics in the press you read. Burst your filter bubble…

…Nobias was founded in 2017 with a mission to promoting responsible/inclusive technology to protect consumers from deceptive or misleading content on the internet. Along the way, we hope to help people understand the landscape of media bias and to give them the power over the algorithms that shape what they read and see online.”

No Bias

The 1619 Project – The New York Times

The 1619 Project is a major initiative from The New York Times observing the 400th anniversary of the beginning of American
slavery. It aims to reframe the country’s history, understanding 1619 as our true founding, and placing the consequences of slavery and the contributions of black Americans at the very center of the story we tell ourselves about who we are.

https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2019/08/14/magazine/1619-america-slavery.html

Build Your Own Text Editor

“This is an instruction booklet that shows you how to build a text editor in C.

The text editor is antirez’s kilo, with some changes. It’s about 1000 lines of C in a single file with no dependencies, and it implements all the basic features you expect in a minimal editor, as well as syntax highlighting and a search feature.

This booklet walks you through building the editor in 184 steps. Each step, you’ll add, change, or remove a few lines of code. Most steps, you’ll be able to observe the changes you made by compiling and running the program immediately afterwards.”

https://viewsourcecode.org/snaptoken/kilo/index.html

Might be interesting to compare to the source code of mg, which is a minimal editor written in C that works like Emacs.

Bookhunter by Shiga

The year is 1973. A priceless book has been stolen from the Oakland Public Library. A crack team of Bookhunters (aka. library police) have less than three days to recover the stolen item. It’s a race against the clock as our heroes use every tool in their arsenal of library equipment to find the book and the mastermind who stole it.” —Bookhunter

Free to read online, and it is available in print.

Weird Fiction Review

“[Weird Fiction Review] is meant to be an ongoing exploration into all facets of the weird, in all of its many forms — a kind of non‐denominational approach that appreciates Lovecraft

but also Kafka, Angela Carter and Clark Ashton Smith, Shirley Jackson and Fritz Leiber — along with the next generation of weird writers and
international weird. The emphasis will be on nonfiction on writers and particular books, but we will also run features on weird art, music, and film, as well as occasional fiction.”

Weird Fiction Review

Discovered Weird Fiction Review (WFR) while reading a review of Dempow Torishima’s Sisyphean, which was described by WFR as “weird [even for] weird fiction.” Sounds like my kind of weird.