Cognitive Bias Cheat Sheet

Four problems that biases help us address:

Problem 1: Too much information.

Problem 2: Not enough meaning.

Problem 3: Need to act fast.

Problem 4: What should we remember?

-Buster Benson, “Cognitive bias cheat sheet.” Medium.com. September 1, 2016.

Recommend reading this in its entirety, but at minimum, it is worth a click through and scroll to the bottom to see the graphic. You can also purchase a poster of the cheat sheet.

A Pragmatic Approach To Thorny People Problems

“I once heard that “Eighty percent of what most children hear is no or some variation thereof (stop, quit, etc).” Children need parental attention. They require it for their very survival and it’s an important part of their socialization process, but most people get far more negative attention in childhood than positive.”

-Doreen Traylor, “A Pragmatic Approach To Thorny People Problems.” WitnessToDestruction.com. Date not specified.

This illustrates the notion of “no response”. You do not pay attention to problem behaviors. You ignore them. You focus, instead, on what you want to see more of. This is operational conditioning 101. Read my summary of Don’t Shoot the Dog.by Karen Pryor. Better yet, read it yourself.

College Return-on-Investment (ROI)

Open Question: Is a college education worth the expense, including tuition, opportunity costs, debt obligation, etc.?

“Using data from the expanded College Scorecard, this report ranks 4,500 colleges and universities by return on investment. A First Try at ROI: Ranking 4,500 Colleges finds that bachelor’s degrees from private colleges, on average, have higher ROI than degrees from public colleges 40 years after enrollment. Community colleges and many certificate programs have the highest returns in the short term, 10 years after enrollment, though returns from bachelor’s degrees eventually overtake those of most two-year credentials.”

A First Try at ROI

The 85% Rule of Learning

“…we learn best when we aim to grasp something just outside the bounds of our existing knowledge. When a challenge is too simple, we don’t learn anything new; likewise, we don’t enhance our knowledge when a challenge is so difficult that we fail entirely or give up. We learn best when we aim to grasp something just outside the bounds of our existing knowledge. When a challenge is too simple, we don’t learn anything new; likewise, we don’t enhance our knowledge when a challenge is so difficult that we fail entirely or give up.”

—Alexis Blue, “15% failure is the learning ‘sweet spot’.” Futurity. November 11, 2019.

The Asshole Filter

“If you find yourself wondering, or just feeling, “Why is everyone I wind up dealing with an asshole?” you might want to consider the possibility that you have set up an asshole filter. Asshole filters are an extremely common phenomenon, and an extremely common problem…

…An asshole filter is a situation one creates that causes non-assholes to reduce contact with you at a disproportionate rate (like at all) than assholes.

The simplest way to do this is to ask politely.

An asshole filter happens when you publicly promulgate a straitened contact boundary and then don’t enforce it; or worse, reward the people who transgress it.”

-siderea, “The Asshole Filter.” siderea.dreamwidth.org. September 15, 2015.

Real Life is a Game

“In this game of life there are two ways of living.

The shadow life and the hero’s journey.

In prison, or in freedom.

As a slave, or as warrior.

What makes the difference?

Your mind. The strongest of all weapons.

-/u/GameStartCancel, “Real life is a game.” reddit.com/r/selfimprovement. November 1, 2019.

While there are worse metaphors than understanding life as a game, or more specifically, a role playing game. It seems that a strong mind would understand that life is exactly what you decide to believe it is, nothing more or nothing less. Cite Viktor Frankl if you must. But, the whole world is mind-made, and you get to choose your metaphors too.