The Impossibility of Comparative Consequences

A calculus of comparative consequences is impossible. Every effort to develop one is a process of rationalizing bias. Consequentialism assumes, based on experience or thought experiments, that it can assess the consequences of a particular act. This position implies that one act causes consequences. These consequences can be evaluated, reduced to some kind of common … Continue reading The Impossibility of Comparative Consequences

Freedom & Limits: The ASUS C201 with libreboot and Parabola Linux

Unfree BIOS Software Surfing the web one day, I came across a mention of libreboot, a free software replacement for BIOS firmware used to load and run operating systems that's been around since December 12, 2013. For many years, the only system you could buy with a free BIOS that could run free software was … Continue reading Freedom & Limits: The ASUS C201 with libreboot and Parabola Linux

The Plain Person’s Guide to Plain Text Social Sciences by Kieran Healy

The Plain Person's Guide to Plain Text Social Science is written for graduate students in the social sciences, but useful for any writer. For people not doing sophisticated data analysis, the key suggestions are to use a text editor like Emacs for writing, Markdown for formatting, git—such as on GitLabs—for version control, and a translator … Continue reading The Plain Person’s Guide to Plain Text Social Sciences by Kieran Healy

The Fallacy of Calories In / Calories Out as a Mental Model for Weight Control

One of the common comments people make about weight control is: "It's just calories in / calories out." It's true, but it's also wrong in important ways. For example, one of the things that we know happens once people reach their thirties is that they start to lose 3-5% of their muscle mass per decade. … Continue reading The Fallacy of Calories In / Calories Out as a Mental Model for Weight Control