Mitrokhin Archive

“The “Mitrokhin Archive” is a collection of handwritten notes which were secretly made by the KGB archivist Vasili Mitrokhin during the thirty years in which he served as a KGB archivist in the foreign intelligence service and the First Chief Directorate. When he defected to the United Kingdom in 1992, he brought the archive with him, in six full trunks. His defection was not officially announced until 1999.[1]

The official historian of MI5, Christopher Andrew,[2] wrote two books, The Sword and the Shield (1999) and The World Was Going Our Way: The KGB and the Battle for the Third World (2005), based on material in the archives. The books purport to provide details about many of the Soviet Union‘s clandestine intelligence operations around the world.

-Wikipedia contributors, “Mitrokhin Archive,” Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia, https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Mitrokhin_Archive&oldid=1046370123 (accessed October 22, 2021).

From Mind Control to Murder? How a Deadly Fall Revealed the CIA’s Darkest Secrets

“Decades later, however, spectacular revelations cast Olson’s death in a completely new light. First, the CIA admitted that, shortly before he died, Olson’s colleagues had lured him to a retreat and fed him LSD without his knowledge. Then it turned out that Olson had talked about leaving the CIA – and told his wife that he had made “a terrible mistake”. Slowly, a counter-narrative emerged: Olson was disturbed about his work and wanted
to quit, leading his comrades to consider him a security risk. All of this led him to room 1018A.”

—By , “From mind control to murder? How a deadly fall revealed the CIA’s darkest secrets.” The Guardian. September 6, 2019.