Peace Privilege

“She describes it as ‘peace privilege,’ approaching the world from a stability that allows for simplifications.

There’s always a lot of denial going on when trauma interrupts our safe outlook on life. We know that people in general don’t want to see horror except in comfortable contexts (like fiction) so seeing human beings systematically torturing, starving and hurting others makes us feel vulnerable, impotent or responsible. It makes us question the comfortable assumptions of our own lives and why have we grown in a safe environment (could it have been by chance?).”

—Manuel Llorens, “‘Peace privilege’ Also Means Disgust for Someone Else’s Suffering.” Caracas Chronicles. May 3, 2019.

And if it is by chance, will the dice roll differently, for me, sometime soon? Fix space and flow across time and we all live in a Caracas, It’s just not Caracas today.

Example: gun control is trying to reduce the systemic risk of individual violence while, at the same time, increasing the systemic risk of organizational and state violence. Are people in Caracas safer when all the guns are in the hands of the colectivos, police and military? What happens when the place you make your home becomes Caracas?

From the Edge of the Universe to the Inside of a Proton

“But we should count ourselves lucky; there have not always been 62 orders of magnitude of universe to explore, and there won’t always be. As Scharf explained, ‘If you turn the clock back far enough to the Big Bang, obviously there was a time when the number of scales that were causally connected were fewer, and space itself was smaller.’ Likewise, ‘if you extrapolate 100 billion years into the future, assuming the current accelerating expansion, it will be essentially impossible for us to see anything much beyond our galaxy or our local group of galaxies.’ Scharf said this seems to mean we’re living at a special time. And he wondered, ‘Would someone in the future be able to figure out how the universe works?’”

—Natalie Wolchover, “A Tour of the Zoomable Universe by Caleb Scharf and Ron Miller.” Quanta Magozine. November 6, 2017

The inspiration for this coffee table book was to update the information in a famous short film, The Powers of Ten (1977):