Attack, Reframe, Normalize and Politicize

The playbook is: Attack, reframe, normalize and politicize. The goal is not rational discussion but repetition. I could write a bot to make far right political comments in Internet forums, and people do. Which leaves the question: how should we respond to people whose ideas could algorithmically programmed and whose goal is repetition? One place to start is simply pointing out what is going on. There’s no point engaging with the content of what is being said because it’s being offered in bad faith.

href.cool: Links of the 2010s

“The AV Club did a list of ‘things’ [that happened in the 2010s]. I wanted to cover stuff that wasn’t on there. A lot happened outside of celebrities, Twitter and momentary memes. (We all obviously love @electrolemon, “double rainbow”, Key & Peele’s Gremlins 2 Brainstorm, 10 hr vids, etc.)

There is a master list of lists as well.

Hope for this list – get u mad & u destroy me & u blog in 2020.”

-https://href.cool/2010s/

Moab Truth

“But if at this stage of the game, given what we know about how social media work and about the incentives of the people who make TV, you’re still getting your dopamine rush by recycling TV-news clips and shouting at people on the Internet, you’re about as close to beyond hope as a human being gets. There is no point talking to you, trying to reason with you, giving you facts and the sources of those facts. You have made yourself invulnerable to reason and evidence. You’re a Moab truther in the making. So, though I do not in theory write anyone off, in practice I do. It’s time to give you up as a lost cause and start figuring out how to prevent the next generation from becoming like you.”

—Alan Jacobs, “on lost causes.” Snakes and Ladders. November 12, 2019

Starlink is a Very Big Deal

“Starlink, continuously spraying bits from the sky, disrupts this model completely. I don’t know of a better way to bring the unconnected billions online. SpaceX is on the way to becoming an internet service provider and, potentially, an internet company to rival Google and Facebook. I bet you didn’t see that coming.”

—Casey Handmer, “Starlink is a very big deal.” CaseyHandmer.WordPress.com. November 2, 2019

Hands down, the best technical overview or Starlink I’ve read.

Using /etc/hosts to Cut Internet Crap

I was using a website this morning that pointed to fonts.googleapis.com. I know this because the url was displayed at the bottom of the browser, as my machine freezed into an unusable state, which required a reboot to return it to functioning again.

It seems strange to me that a website should be able freeze both a browser and the machine running it. But, minimally, I thought I should prevent downloading fonts from google from doing it in the future.

With a little web searching, I came across this article, “Fix Slow Page Loading Waiting for fonts.googleapis.com.” I made the appropriate changes to my /etc/host file and noticed an immediate improvement on the loading of the site I was using.

So, not being one for half-measures, I thought, “I wonder if there’s a good list to block most of these types of sites that slow down the web experience…” Of course, there are many. I ended up choosing Steven Black‘s list: Unified hosts + fakenews + gambling + porn + social because it is used by the previously mentioned Pi-Hole as one of its filters. I kept my original host file, noting in the top where to get an updated list and just added everything after: # Custom host records are listed here. to the end of the file.

Works beautifully. I’ll live with it for a few months and post an update here of any problems I encounter. However, this seems like a good option for cutting down the amount of crap you come across on the Internet and will likely speed web page load times considerably. If you need more explicit instructions, this article seems to provide a good discussion on how to do it across different platforms..

Adaptation Response

“Stress + Rest = Growth. It’s as simple and as hard as that.”

-Brad Stulberg, “The Equation That Will Make You Better at Everything.” Outside Magazine. July 26, 2019.

There’s a lot of advice on the internet. From the vague, live your best life, to the strangely specific, drink more water, everyone has a suggestion about changes we can make that is going to make our lives better. Most of it is harmless, even if it is baloney.

But, this idea about stress is good, if poorly articulated. The problem is that ‘Stress’ should be ‘Training.’

Stress is not necessarily good. Hate your job and find yourself wolfing down a whole Meat Lover’s Pizza from Domino’s Pizza every Friday night? That’s a maladaptive response to stress.

Training, on the other hand, implies a purpose. It also implies progression.

I read an article in Men’s Journal several years ago, called “Everything You Know About Fitness Is a Lie.” It covers a lot of territory, such as bad gyms, but the main idea is that if we want to be fit, we need to train to be strong. If you want to get strong, you should probably listen to Mark Rippetoe:

It is May 15, and you decide that this year you are going to get a suntan – a glorious, beautiful, tropical suntan. So you decide to go out in the back yard (to spare the neighbors and innocent passers-by) to lay out at lunchtime and catch a ray or two. You lie on your back for 15 minutes and flip over to lie on your belly for 15 minutes. Then you get up, come in and eat lunch, and go back to work. That night, your skin is a little pink, so the next day you just eat lunch, but the following day you’re back outside for your 15-minutes-per-side sunbath. You are faithful to your schedule, spending 30 minutes outside every day that week, because that’s the kind of disciplined, determined person you are. At the end of the week, you have turned a more pleasant shade of brown, and, heartened by your results, resolve to maintain your 30-minutes-per-day schedule for the rest of the month. So, here is the critical question: what color is your skin at the end of the month?”

-Mark Rippetoe, “The Biggest Training Fallacy of All.” StartingStrength.com. May 6, 2013.

The vast majority of people get this question wrong because they think a month long change of behavior is stress. The reality is that we have adapted to the new stress within a week. As Mark puts it:

“[A]daptation occurs in response to the stress, and specifically to that stress, because the stress is what causes the adaptation. This is why calluses form on the part of your hand where the bar rubs, and not on the other parts of the hand, or on your face, or all over your body. It can obviously be no other way.

Furthermore, the stress must be capable of being recovered from. Like the 2 hours of sun the first day or the 55 bench reps once a month, the stress must be appropriate for the trainee receiving it. So, if the stress is so overwhelming that it cannot be recovered from in time to apply more of it in a time frame which permits accumulated adaptation, it is useless as a beneficial tool that drives progress. And if this excessive stress is applied so infrequently that any adaptation to it has dispersed before you get around to it again 3 months later, no adaptation can accumulate.

An awareness of this central organizing principle of physiology as it applies to physical activity is essential to program design. Exercise and training are two different thingsExercise is physical activity for its own sake, a workout done for the effect it produces today, during the workout or right after you’re through. Training is physical activity done with a longer-term goal in mind, the constituent workouts of which are specifically designed to produce that goal. If a program of physical activity is not designed to get you stronger or faster or better conditioned by producing a specific stress to which a specific desirable adaptation can occur, you don’t get to call it training. It is just exercise…

-ibid.

You could replace stress for exercise in the preceding paragraph, and it would still be right. The adaptive response is a fact of life, whether we are talking about our careers, skills or relationships. But, how many of us are deliberately training ourselves toward goals by seeking out new challenges? The problem with advice like: “Stress + Rest = Growth” is that it’s like sitting out in the sun for 15 minutes a day and thinking it’s going to result in a tan. Having a goal is useless if the road you are walking on won’t take you there. In order to grow, we need to plan and progress toward it. Stress, by itself, isn’t going to do it.