textfiles.com

“There are some ugly things down in these archives; there are narcissistic ravings from pre-adolescent social misfits. There are calls for anarchy. There’s satanism, there’s racism, there’s all the -isms in the book lurking in the words. But there’s hope, too. There’s excitement, there’s joy, there’s every manner of feeling being crammed down into ASCII and posted for the world to find. It’s a spectrum of humanity, and this is what I hope you’ll find, buried there, among the text.”

http://textfiles.com

What to know what early BBS culture was like? That your parents and grandparents were just like you? There’s a website for that.

Grovertruk

All you really need to know is that someone decided to document a van life buildout that features a firepit. The fact that this was inspired by Groverhaus, which was a dangerous and crazy decision a guy named Grover and his wife decided to build an add-on to his home without professional help, is interesting backstory.

If you like this kind of thing, then try subscribing to Garbage Day. It’s the cream of notable weird on the Internet without actually having to use sites like Something Awful. Win/win.

Bonus: Check out “the the Fieri Frames blog, which takes screenshots from Diners, Drive-Ins, And Dives and puts weird and unsettling captions on them,” as another example of what Garbage Day gives you, this time from Tumblr.

href.cool: Links of the 2010s

“The AV Club did a list of ‘things’ [that happened in the 2010s]. I wanted to cover stuff that wasn’t on there. A lot happened outside of celebrities, Twitter and momentary memes. (We all obviously love @electrolemon, “double rainbow”, Key & Peele’s Gremlins 2 Brainstorm, 10 hr vids, etc.)

There is a master list of lists as well.

Hope for this list – get u mad & u destroy me & u blog in 2020.”

-https://href.cool/2010s/

Cultural Good Ol’ Days

“I know people don’t read books like they used to, and they don’t think like they used to, but I struggle to care. Most of this talk is pure nostalgia, a kind of mostly knee-jerk, mostly uncritical (although not thoughtless) response to entirely rational fears about technological opacity and complexity (this nostalgia, of course, was the basis for the New Aesthetic). But this understandable reaction also erases all the new and different modes of attention and thought which, while they are difficult to articulate because we are still developing and discovering the language to articulate them with, are nonetheless present and growing within us. And I simply do not see the damage that is ascribed to this perceived “loss” – I don’t see the generations coming up being any less engaged in culture and society, reading less, thinking less, acting less, even when they are by any measure poorer, less supported, forced to struggle harder for education and employment, and, to compound the injury, derided at every opportunity as feckless, distracted, and disengaged. I see the opposite.”

—James Bridle, “Reading Right-to-Left.” booktwo.org. October 15, 2015.