Mitrokhin Archive

“The “Mitrokhin Archive” is a collection of handwritten notes which were secretly made by the KGB archivist Vasili Mitrokhin during the thirty years in which he served as a KGB archivist in the foreign intelligence service and the First Chief Directorate. When he defected to the United Kingdom in 1992, he brought the archive with him, in six full trunks. His defection was not officially announced until 1999.[1]

The official historian of MI5, Christopher Andrew,[2] wrote two books, The Sword and the Shield (1999) and The World Was Going Our Way: The KGB and the Battle for the Third World (2005), based on material in the archives. The books purport to provide details about many of the Soviet Union‘s clandestine intelligence operations around the world.

-Wikipedia contributors, “Mitrokhin Archive,” Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia, https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Mitrokhin_Archive&oldid=1046370123 (accessed October 22, 2021).

Explaining the ‘Mystery’ of Numbers Stations

“Numbers stations have been in existence since World War I. Over the years they have attracted sporadic interest from journalists, video game designers, and filmmakers. Despite this attention, there are few explanations of what these signals actually are. Too often, they are described as “spooky,” “creepy,” or “mysterious,” and the discussion stops there. It may be disappointing to some, but these stations are not signals from aliens or mind control devices, nor are they dead relics of the Cold War — rather, these stations are part of the sophisticated work of intelligence agencies and militaries, and they are very much still on the air. This article will explain what they are, how to listen to them, and why they matter.”

—Māris Goldmanis. “Explaining the ‘Mystery’ of Numbers Stations.” War on the Rocks. May 24, 2018.