The Oppression of the Supermajority

“The defining political fact of our time is not polarization. It’s the inability of even large bipartisan majorities to get what [the public] wants…

…In our era, it is primarily Congress that prevents popular laws from being passed or getting serious consideration. (Holding an occasional hearing does not count as “doing something.”) Entire categories of public policy options are effectively off-limits because of the combined influence of industry groups and donor interests. There is no principled defense of this state of affairs — and indeed, no one attempts to offer such a justification. Instead, legislative stagnation is cynically defended by those who benefit from it with an unconvincing invocation of the rigors of our system of checks and balances.”

—Tim Wu, “The Oppression of the Supermajority.” The New York Times. March 5, 2019.