How to Destroy the Earth

“This is not a guide for wusses whose aim is merely to wipe out humanity. I can in no way guarantee the complete extinction of the human race via any of these methods, real or imaginary. Humanity is wily and resourceful, and many of the methods outlined below will take many years to even become available, let alone implement, by which time mankind may well have spread to other planets; indeed, other star systems. If total human genocide is your ultimate goal, you are reading the wrong document. There are far more efficient ways of doing this, many which are available and feasible RIGHT NOW. Nor is this a guide for those wanting to annihilate everything from single-celled life upwards, render Earth uninhabitable or simply conquer it. These are trivial goals in comparison.

This is a guide for those who do not want the Earth to be there anymore.”

qntm, “How to destroy the Earth.” qntm.org. April 4, 2003.

For the record, I’m favoring: “A variation on [the cooked in a solar oven method involving] turning the Sun into a gigantic hydrogen gas laser.” Of course, swallowed up by the Sun as it becomes a red giant seems to be a certainty, if you are prepared to wait 5 billion years. I think I’m going to wait, everyone.

Grovertruk

All you really need to know is that someone decided to document a van life buildout that features a firepit. The fact that this was inspired by Groverhaus, which was a dangerous and crazy decision a guy named Grover and his wife decided to build an add-on to his home without professional help, is interesting backstory.

If you like this kind of thing, then try subscribing to Garbage Day. It’s the cream of notable weird on the Internet without actually having to use sites like Something Awful. Win/win.

Bonus: Check out “the the Fieri Frames blog, which takes screenshots from Diners, Drive-Ins, And Dives and puts weird and unsettling captions on them,” as another example of what Garbage Day gives you, this time from Tumblr.

Imagining Chapel Perilous

“Once you are in the Chapel [Perilous], Wilson insisted, there are only two ways out: as an agnostic, or a stone-cold paranoid. “There is no third way.”…

…Like so many drugs, the Imagination is both poison and cure, and we are not getting rid of that paradox any more than we are getting rid of pop paranoia or conspiracy politics or apocalyptic psyops. Living with Imagination does not involve the transcendence of pathology, but something more daemonic, more ironic, and also probably more tragic. The Imagination provides forms of sense-making that do not deny the chaotic disorders of our inner wilderness, and it nourishes us to the degree that we approach it as an ally to barter with rather than an overlord to slavishly believe or a “cognitive bias” to avoid.

—Erik Davis, “Wilderness of Mirrors.” Burning Shore. No. 8., August 25, 2020.

Marginalization and Being Weird

“One thing I think this illustrates is how non-transferable experiences of marginalisation are. bell hooks obviously has more experience of marginalisation than I do – she is a black woman in the US, while I am in most regards a fairly privileged white man. But I am also a queer neurodivergent person, and the experience of small towns for people like me is literally the worst.

If you’re sufficiently “weird” and live or go to school in a small town, chances are pretty good you know almost nobody like you, and it’s awful. In a large city you may still struggle to find people like you, but those people are at least there and once you’ve found a few you will find more through them. It is possible to build a community of people like you, and to build a love ethic within that community, in a way that I don’t think people like me are ever going to really find in a small town.”

-David R. MacIver, “The conditional love of a small town.” DRMacIver’s Notebook. April 27, 2020.

Recommend David’s blog in general. Personally, I find I agree with much of what he says. I’ve been “weird” to other people my whole life, but I’ve never identified as being “neurodivergent”, a term I’ve only come to know in the last few years. However, it is a useful way to understand being out of step with the world and helps bring a sense of normality to being different.

Bizarro Fiction

Readers in the horror genre want horror. Readers of erotica want something titillating. Bizarro fiction readers want something weird.

“The introduction to the first Bizarro Starter Kit describes Bizarro as ‘literature’s equivalent to the cult section at the video store’ and a genre that ‘strives not only to be strange, but fascinating, thought-provoking, and, above all, fun to read.'[1] According to Rose O’Keefe of Eraserhead Press: ‘Basically, if an audience enjoys a book or film primarily because of its weirdness, then it is Bizarro. Weirdness might not be the work’s only appealing quality, but it is the major one.'[2]”

—Wikipedia, s.v. “Bizarro fiction,” last modified May 7, 2019, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bizarro_fiction

Eraserhead Press is a major publisher. Thought I might try a short story collection with a GoodReads rating above four, Entropy in Bloom by Jeremy Robert Johnson. Interested in suggestions if anyone reading this has any.