Bizarro Fiction

Readers in the horror genre want horror. Readers of erotica want something titillating. Bizarro fiction readers want something weird.

“The introduction to the first Bizarro Starter Kit describes Bizarro as ‘literature’s equivalent to the cult section at the video store’ and a genre that ‘strives not only to be strange, but fascinating, thought-provoking, and, above all, fun to read.'[1] According to Rose O’Keefe of Eraserhead Press: ‘Basically, if an audience enjoys a book or film primarily because of its weirdness, then it is Bizarro. Weirdness might not be the work’s only appealing quality, but it is the major one.'[2]”

—Wikipedia, s.v. “Bizarro fiction,” last modified May 7, 2019, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bizarro_fiction

Eraserhead Press is a major publisher. Thought I might try a short story collection with a GoodReads rating above four, Entropy in Bloom by Jeremy Robert Johnson. Interested in suggestions if anyone reading this has any.

Politics as Cult

“…members of “totalistic” cults—those that consider their ideology the one true path—share four key characteristics. They 1) espouse an all-encompassing belief system; 2) exhibit excessive devotion to the leader; 3) avoid criticism of the group and its leader; and 4) feel disdain for non-members.”

—Tom Jacobs. “A Cult Expert Finds Familiar Patterns of Behavior in Trump’s GOP.” Pacific Standard. June 21, 2018.

I know people with liberal politics love diagnosing what is wrong with Trump and the Republican party in the United States. But, this criteria is every bit as relevant to Democratic politics as the GOP in the United States. Believe that your country has no business spending a half a trillion dollars a year on the military and maintaining almost 1,000 military bases abroad? Both major U.S. political parties subscribe to that notion and cannot even entertain the possibility that it might not be a good idea to spend this way on war.