Brought to Light

“In 1989, at the very end of the Cold War, a group of four prominent mainstream and alternative comic book writers and artists created a double volume graphic novel exposing the rampant injustices, assassinations, and terrorism facilitated by the CIA and its creatures worldwide, ostensibly to fight global communism in the years following World War II. This pair of books, sold under the shared title Brought To Light, came courtesy of one of the only justice movements since the Church Committee to successfully take on the American deep state and confront the CIA’s historical criminal behavior.”

-Brought to Light is a graphic novel of two parts: Shadowplay — The Secret Team and Flashpoint — The La Penca Bombing

Shadowplay is by Alan Moore and “centers on an avatar of the CIA and American imperialism in the form of a maniacal, drunken bald eagle who ‘represent[s] the Company,’ the common sobriquet for the CIA, and who explains American intelligence interference abroad in terms of the brutality and murder necessary to protect American (business) interests.” Flashpoint provides the details of an assassination of a former Sandinista who has switched sides to join the Contras. However, he found the CIA’s involvement with the Contras troubling, and he was assassinated before he could reveal too much about the CIA and what became known as the “Iran-Contra affair” in the United States.

h/t We Are The Mutants.

C.G Jung, Artist

“Although C.G. Jung is best known to us for his groundbreaking innovations in the field of psychiatry/psychotherapy (after all, he was the founder of analytical psychiatry), and also his anthropological work to some degree, he is now also recognized today for his work as an artist…Like many Jung enthusiasts I think that his most innovative work can be found in the paintings that he did for his Red Book. Also known as Liber Novus, this book was written during the years 1914-1918, during a prolonged mental breakdown that found Jung experiencing bizarre dreams, visions, and curious confrontations with this psyche (it was thanks to these experiences that Jung was later able to conceive his theories on the Active Imagination, the Collective Unconsciousness, the Anima and Animus, and Individuation). In the years following the transmission of The Red Book, Jung began to enhance it with his own proto-psychedelic paintings (to better illustrate the text), and I must say that I quite like most of these paintings that he did for it: to my eyes they look like they could have come off the cover of some obscure European prog rock albums, or the cover art from some 1970’s fantasy paperback dime store novel. In any event, I present you now with a number of images (24 to be precise) from Jung’s Red Book, so you can see for yourself and judge their merit with your own eyes.”

-Dennis Cooper, “Sypha presents … The Proto-Psychedelic Art of C.G. Jung’s The Red Book.” denniscooperblog.com. February 5, 2020.

Click through to see the images, which I think are lovely.

Haeckel’s Radiolaria

“Haeckel was evidently just as fascinated with the protozoa, enough to write and illustrate a substantial monograph. Die Radiolarien (Rhizopoda radiaria): Eine Monographie (1862) is available at the Biodiversity Heritage Library and the Internet Archive in a mammoth four-volume set, a large portion of which is explanatory text. There’s also a separate volume with a selection of the plates alone which is easier to browse. These drawings show much more variety than the Kunstformen plates which represent the examples that Haeckel considered most visually appealing; they also show us how much Haeckel tailored his renderings for Kunstformen, favouring symmetry and harmony over natural imperfections. Oscar Wilde would have approved of Haeckel’s adjustments, as he writes in The Decay of Lying: “My own experience is that the more we study Art, the less we care for Nature. What Art really reveals to us is Nature’s lack of design, her curious crudities, her extraordinary monotony, her absolutely unfinished condition. Nature has good intentions, of course, but, as Aristotle once said, she cannot carry them out.”

-John Coulthart, “Haeckel’s Radiolaria.” { feuilleton }. February 14, 2020.

I found many of these plates striking.