A History of Race and Racism in America

“I’ve selected the most influential books on race and the black experience published in the United States for each decade of the nation’s existence — a history of race through ideas, arranged chronologically on the shelf. (In many cases, I’ve added a complementary work, noted with an asterisk.) Each of these books was either published first in the United States or widely read by Americans. They inspired — and sometimes ended — the fiercest debates of their times: debates over slavery, segregation, mass incarceration. They offered racist explanations for inequities, and antiracist correctives. Some — the poems of Phillis Wheatley, the memoir of Frederick Douglass — stand literature’s test of time. Others have been roundly debunked by science, by data, by human experience. No list can ever be comprehensive, and ‘most influential’ by no means signifies ‘best.’ But I would argue that together, these works tell the history of anti-black racism in the United States as painfully, as eloquently, as disturbingly as words can. In many ways, they also tell its present.”

-Ibram X. Kendi, “A History of Race and Racism in America, in 24 Chapters.” The New York Times. February 22, 2017.

To accompany Ibram X. Kendi’s, “How to be an antiracist.”

The 1619 Project – The New York Times

The 1619 Project is a major initiative from The New York Times observing the 400th anniversary of the beginning of American slavery. It aims to reframe the country’s history, understanding 1619 as our true founding, and placing the consequences of slavery and the contributions of black Americans at the very center of the story we tell ourselves about who we are.

https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2019/08/14/magazine/1619-america-slavery.html

An American National Weakness

“…As a nation, we are relatively intolerant of long waits, and we’re not sufficiently focused on the long-term solutions of exercise and good diet. We love the quick fix, we want it on our terms, and we hate being told no…

I do think these tendencies reflect a kind of American national weakness, and that we would be better off if we had a less consumerist, more philosophical, and indeed more spartan approach to our health and well-being. That would lead to less overtreatment, less strain on health-care resources, and in the longer run a healthier nation with a sounder fiscal position for the federal government.

—Cowen, Tyler. “Spending a Lot on Health Care Is the American Way.” Bloomberg. July 20, 2017.